Women's Suffrage

The seed for the first Woman's Rights Convention was planted in 1840, when Elizabeth Cady Stanton met Lucretia Mott at the World Anti-Slavery Convention in London, the conference that refused to seat Mott and other women delegates from America because of their sex. Stanton, the young bride of an antislavery agent, and Mott, a Quaker preacher and veteran of reform, talked then of calling a convention to address the condition of women. Eight years later, it came about as a spontaneous event.

First Ladies

The National Portrait Gallery is well-known for our collection of presidential portraits, but we also have a comprehensive collection of the nation's first ladies...

Miniatures

Portrait miniatures are small, engaging, painted likenesses usually created as love tokens or personal mementoes. They were very popular during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By the 1840s, with the rise of photographic processes, small portraits were often made in that medium as well. In the later nineteenth century, portrait miniatures, often painted by women, experienced a great revival.

One Life: The Mask of Lincoln

In the two-hundredth year since his birth, Abraham Lincoln remains as much a puzzle as he was to his contemporaries. That he came from nothing and was an obscure figure, almost to the moment of his nomination for the presidency, only adds to his mystery. His essential nature remains elusive, despite our best efforts to reveal the "real" Lincoln. Perhaps, though, that very mysteriousness is the key to his character and personality.

Presidential Portraits

The nation's only complete collection of presidential portraits outside the White House, this exhibition lies at the heart of the Portrait Gallery's mission to tell the American story through the individuals who have shaped it.

Grant and Lee

The rivalry between generals Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee is one of the most memorable in American military history. Lee was a polished and seemingly invincible Confederate commander who encountered Grant, a rough-hewn upstart, in the Virginia campaigns of 1864 and 1865. Grant and Lee both stand alone as genuine world historical individuals in their impact on America, but they are also are the product of their relationship to each other.

Subscribe to National Portrait Gallery RSS